Seventh Tacoma Homicide of 2014 Renee Brooks

reneebrooksIt was between five and six in the morning on Thursday July 3rd. A man walked into his apartment in the 1100 block of Highlands Parkway just off of Pearl Street. Witnesses heard two or three shots. And then he left.

The next day on the Fourth of July, a friend and coworker of 28-year-old Renee Brooks’ stopped by that apartment. They had become concerned about her whereabouts and came to check on her.  The friend found Renee’s body and called the police.

Renee’s death had been caused by multiple gun shots. Renee’s husband would be found and arrested on Tacoma’s South Side near South 49th Street on Saturday.

Renee worked at Subway and had previously worked at the Tacoma Rescue Mission. Renee, her husband and 3-year-old daughter had only moved into that apartment a few weeks ago. Neighbors say there were frequent fights.

Renee has become the seventh Tacoma homicide this year and the sixth Tacoma homicide this year that involved domestic violence. When the person responsible for the murder is a romantic partner, a parent, or child of the victim a homicide becomes an even worse tragedy for the family. Love ones are shocked and torn up by such a stunning event. Often it’s nearly impossible to reconcile the violent actions with the loved ones they once knew.

If you or someone you know is involved in a situation or relationship that is abusive or violent, I urge you to look into some of the resources at the link below. I’d rather not have to write an article like this about you.
http://www.cityoftacoma.org/cms/one.aspx?objectId=20334

As always, the comments section is reserved for friends and family of Renee Brooks. Please share your thoughts and memories of Renee with us. Tell us about her life and what Tacoma has lost with her death.

-          Jack Cameron

Sixth Tacoma Homicide of 2014 Terrence Green

terrencegreenOn June 13th, 3-year-old Terrence Green was brought in to a local urgent care center by his father. He was lethargic and vomiting. A nurse advised him to take the child to the Emergency Room. His father chose not to do that. On Saturday, eight days later Terrance was brought to the hospital. He was unconscious. Doctors would soon find multiple injuries on his chest and head including a skull fracture. They would perform CPR a dozen times over the course of the next two days before finally taking Terrance off life support on Monday.

Terrence’s parents did not live together. Terrence had spent most of the last month with his father. He shared a bed with his father. According to his mother, Terrance had repeatedly wet the bed. His father has been arrested and charged with Terrance’s death.

Any time a life is taken from our city, it’s a tragedy. But it’s especially tragic when that life is so short lived. Terrence Green was only three-years-old. We will never really know what we’ve lost with his death.

The grief of the friends and family of Terrence is something I can’t imagine. My condolences to them all. As always, the comments section is reserved for those who knew the victim or their family and want to post remembrances.

-          Jack Cameron

Tacoma Homicide FAQ

policelineI’ve been writing about homicides in Tacoma since 2006. Over the years I’ve received dozens of emails from the families and friends of victims. These emails are what I look at whenever I feel like I should stop. They remind me that what I write sometimes is exactly the thing a grieving person wants to see. If I can be even a small amount of comfort, then I don’t see how I can morally stop writing about these times when people are taken from our city.

I also receive emails and am asked questions in person about how I go about writing these things and why I write about one thing and not another. I’m going to try to tackle all of these frequently asked questions in this post. Here goes:

How Do You Get The Information About Tacoma Homicides?

Almost every piece of information I post about Tacoma homicides is found online through a combination of news reports, my own research, and a handful of local contacts.

Unfortunately, it’s a lot easier to get information on how homicide victims died than it is to get information on how they lived. I do my best to include details about the person who was killed whenever possible, but I more than anything I rely on the friends and family of the victims to help share who we’ve lost from our cities. In some circumstances, I’ve welcomed friends and families to do guest posts about their loved ones.

Why Don’t You Write About Vehicular Homicides?

Most police departments treat these differently than regular homicides. In fact up until recently you perpetrators of vehicular homicide only received a third of the sentence they might have received if they’d shot the victim. But the reason I don’t cover them is simply that they’re difficult to cover. Often charges aren’t brought until long after the incident and if I covered every vehicular death then I might as well start covering every unnatural death and that’s beyond the scope of what I want to accomplish here.

Why Don’t You Write About Suicides?

I want to write about suicides. There are far more suicides in Tacoma than homicides. But they’re rarely reported to the media and so getting any relevant information is difficult. Some suicides make the news and others don’t and I’d rather cover no suicides than just some of them.

Why Didn’t You Cover That Homicide in University Place/Fife/Parkland/Lakewood/Spanaway/Etc?

When I started TacomaStories.com I decided that as much as possible I’d confine my posts to things about the City of Tacoma because if I included surrounding areas I’m not sure where I’d stop. Do I include Federal Way? If so, do I also include SeaTac? Where does it end?  I would more than welcome someone else picking up the torch for Lakewood or other local cities and starting LakewoodStories.com or something.

What’s The Worst Thing That’s Come Out of Writing About Tacoma Homicides?

There have been a couple of death threats and an incident that I had to report to the police before it became something violent, but thankfully nothing ever came of any of it. It was also difficult to write about a former classmate of mine who was shot and killed.

So…Why Do You Do It?

I’d started out writing about Tacoma’s homicides to prove a point about the city and its reputation. It’s a far safer city than it was in the 1990s. In fact it’s so safe that I can write about every Tacoma homicide and still do other things. Not a possibility in a place like Chicago. In fact even Seattle has 3-4 homicides a month vs. Tacoma’s one homicide a month sometimes.

However, as I stated at the beginning of this, the reason I keep writing about Tacoma homicides is that the families and friends of the victims appreciate it. I’ve heard from people sometimes years after their loved one’s death. In some cases my article is the only online evidence of what happened.

That’s about it for now. If you have any other questions for me, let me know.

-          Jack Cameron

5 Question Friday With Josh Evans from Narrows 8 Theatres

narrowsI grew up in Tacoma. I went to Wilson High School. And when I went to the movies, I went to Narrow Plaza and the Narrows 8 Theatres. Unfortunately as movie theaters evolved the Narrows 8 did not. Soon thanks to lack of stadium seating and subpar sound system, Narrows 8 closed down. Since then, it’s sat empty. But there are a group of people trying to change that and bring Narrows 8 back to University Place and Tacoma, but they need your help. I contacted Josh Evans about this and he was more than happy to share his vision of what could become the best movie theater in Tacoma. Here’s Josh:

1. What is JRE Digital Cinemas?

JRE Digital Cinemas Inc. is a family owned corporation legally formed in the state of Montana November of 2013 and relocated to Washington March 2014. Our ultimate goal is to offer affordable entertainment to the masses. My name is Joshua Evans and I serve as CEO for the company, taking the vision of all of our share holders (myself, my father Martin Evans, Mother Pamella Evans, Brother Daniel Evans and our sister Sarah Evans) and forming a solid plan to see that vision become a reality. I originally had the idea so form a company with my family when I returned from Connecticut in 2012. Having operated a 10 screen sub run theater in a competitive market against a Regal Entertainment Cinema I learned valuable information about the cinema exhibition industry and gained insight into what creates a working business model in that industry. My former business partner and I were not able to make our cinema in Connecticut a success because we were under capitalized and the transition to digital projection was well underway. Unfortunately, the finances to make the transition were just not available to us at that time.

I originally showed interest in the former 8 screen first run theatre located on Mildred street in University Place Washington, I believe in June of last year. I had talked with my family and we decided to form a corporation for the purpose of eventually re-opening this cinema. We discussed the cost of the renovations and the level of funding needed, at that time we had no idea of the condition of the building, furniture or equipment in the building. We later found out that the building has been all but gutted by the previous operator.  Our main focus was to revitalize this cinema, create a locally owned and operated location that would be a benefit to the community and surrounding businesses. I Know first hand what losing a destination draw like a cinema can do to surrounding restaurants and local businesses that rely on that foot traffic for revenue. I knew that other businesses on Mildred street had to have been suffering and seen a decline in businesses since this cinema closed. With that in mind we started piecing together a plan to reopen the cinema and help to bring back those lost customers to the area, thus, JRE Digital Cinemas Inc. was born. The name is derived in memoriam from my late sister’s initials: Jennifer Rae Evans (JRE).

 

My father Martin has been on disability for most of my life, struggling with Multiple-sclerosis and still trying to earn enough money to support our family. Right now they live on a very tight fixed income and each time dad has attempted to re-enter the work force he ends up losing that battle due to his illness. He needs something that can be flexible enough so that when he has episodes of MS he doesn’t have to hit the pavement yet again. Employers love my dad. He is intelligent, hardworking, and dedicated but the limitations of his body make it difficult to stay productive at a full-time job. We, in part, wanted to form this company so that he can be involved in something that can provide certain flexibilities and still remain a productive member of society and provide for his family. So when you ask what JRE Digital Cinemas is I have one simple answer: it is Desire, Passion, and Love. Desire to provide for one’s family and take care of the people who love and support you. Passion to provide the community an entertainment destination that families and people of all income levels can enjoy. Love of our community, family, and loyal customers.
 2. What’s the current status of the Narrow 8 Theatre?

We have researched the location, condition and funding requirements to make this dream a reality. We believe the local community will support this theatre when it reopens. It needs a lot of work! The building currently has no concession counter, seats, screens or equipment. Most of the carpet has been damaged or removed. We would need to install new digital projection. As far as the project itself, we need help and I’m not afraid to reach out to the local community for that help. We need to secure funds of at very minimum $50,000 in order to secure funding to repair the interior, replace seats and to install new equipment. Our goal also includes upgrades to the auditoriums including “retro-fit foam risers” (http://www.stadiumseating.com/solutions.php) to provide for stadium style seating. We have put together a rough estimate for building repairs and upgrades and have come up with a number that will allow us to accomplish all of our goals. The total funding required to get the cinema open is around $750,000. We plan to reach out to the local economic development organizations within pierce county and also at the state level. We also plan to utilize SBA backed loans but the required “Down Payment” needed would be in the 10-15% range, and cannot be borrowed, meaning, we can’t simply ask one lender to loan the funds needed to secure financing from another lender.

We fully believe it IS possible to make this project a reality. If the community would rally behind us and support our Indiegogo campaign, or a wealthy community member wanted to be a partner in our venture we could secure the required funds. We hope by getting our vision and story out to the public supporters of this project will come forward and help us out.
3. What’s different about what you want to do to the Narrows 8 Theatre?

The thing about operating a cinema in a competitive market is you HAVE to offer something unique compared to other theatres. What we have in mind is fairly simple: we plan to be a community hub. A locally owned and operated cinema involved in community activities, offering support to other local businesses all while keeping the consumer in mind when making business decisions. We want everyone in University Place and surrounding areas to feel like this is their theatre not some chain that won’t take the time to hear your feedback or get to know you by name.

We also plan to have a few things not commonly found in major chain theatres. We want to bring different ideas to light at this location like self-serve drink stations, free refills on soda, and even a coffee shop located inside the lobby offering fraps, blended coffee drinks and smoothies. We also offer traditional movie concessions at much lower prices than most chains and unique treats you probably wouldn’t find in most cinemas.

We want to reach out to the local community and hold events at our cinema. A few things that set us apart in Connecticut included hosting a film and music festival featuring only Connecticut films either filmed in Connecticut or directed by a Connecticut resident and showcasing only Connecticut based bands and musicians. We also hosted a launch party for a group of film students who had produced a full feature film. We offered a venue for them to show the film to potential distributors and backers to get the film on contract for distribution. This type of community involvement is usually only seen at local cinemas with a connection to the community.

Let’s talk a little more about “affordability” and what that means for the Narrows 8 Theatre. Ticket prices will be $6.00 matinee (before 3pm) and $10 evening, 3D films would be $8.50 matinee and $12.50 evening. Every Tuesday will be “DiscountTuesday” offering ticket prices at $6.00 all day (3D would be $2.50 additional). Concession deals like a “$3.00 Any Size Popcorn” would be a regularly occurring promotion and our boxed candy would also be lower than most first run theatres. At times in our previous cinema we had candy deals, $2.00 a box during peak times throughout the year. Local movie goers can expect to see punch cards similar to what you would find at a drive-thru coffee shop where ticket purchases would earn you FREE movie passes. We are aggressive with social media deals and coupons as well as free movie pass giveaways . Group ticket prices for large groups like childcare facilities, non-profits, schools, and summer youth programs have always held a top priority in our business model. In short, our “uniqueness” comes from operating a full-scale first-run cinema as a small, local business, and for the community to treat it as such.
4. How can people interested in this project help out?

First and foremost the easiest way to help is to spread the word about us. Tell everyone you know and then tell them again! You can reach our facebook page at: https://www.facebook.com/Narrows8Theatres or follow us on twitter at:https://twitter.com/narrows8theatre.

Secondly, we have an online crowd funding campaign on Indiegogo. Contributors can essentially “pre-purchase” products and services anywhere from coupons, movie passes, t-shirts to collector’s merchandise and on-screen advertising space. The link to the campaign is https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/narrows-8-digital-theatres or you can visit www.indiegogo.com and search for “Narrows 8 Theatres”. Place a small contribution of $5-$5,000 and once we have reached the end of our campaign we will start delivering the contribution “perks” and get the ball rolling to get the theatre open.

Lastly, if you would like to discuss becoming an equity partner or even just to drop me a line about the theatre please email me at jevans91775@gmail.com.

5. What do you see as the future for Narrows 8 Theatre?

We see a successful venture between the community and ourselves. We plan to grow with the industry and constantly improve the cinema going experience for patrons of the Narrows 8 Digital Theatres. We want to become an integral part of the community backed by the support of the people. We plan on being involved with local issues, events, and programs. We see ourselves as a viable business, creating jobs and providing tax dollars for the state and city to fund much needed projects. We see a place where patrons can go and feel safe, comfortable, and a part of something great.

We love getting to know our customers on a personal level, what a difference it makes in customer service. It’s almost funny how a person reacts when they visit a movie theatre and see the owner behind the counter making popcorn or maybe tearing your ticket or even cleaning theatres after shows saying: “Thank you for coming to our theatre! We hope you enjoyed your movie! See you next time!”

We look forward to seeing each and every one of you at the Narrows 8 Digital Theatres!

I’d like to thank Josh for taking the time to fill us in on his vision and I hope readers will help out. This is a project that deserves to be funded.

As always, if you or someone you know would like to join me for 5 Question Friday, let me know at jackcameronis@gmail.com

-       Jack Cameron

Fifth Tacoma Homicide of 2014 Richard Salzman

ME_arrivesLast Friday night 49-year-old Richard Salzman had an argument with his wife over the phone. His wife chose to stay at a family member’s house. The next morning his wife returned home in the 1900 Block of S. Mason Ave. and found no sign of her husband. Their 16-year-old-son said he’d left the night before on his bike. At some point on Saturday when there was still no sign of him, his wife reported him missing to the Tacoma Police Department. On Tuesday when Richard’s wife started talking about organizing a search party her son told her what happened after her phone call on Friday.  He told her that heard their argument and confronted his father. He said that his father shoved him. His son then hit him in the head with a cane killing him. He then put Richard’s body along with a cut up bicycle into the compost bin behind the house. His mother had him call the police and tell them what happened. We’ll likely never know for certain what exactly happened in Richard Salzman’s final moments. What’s clear is that a domestic dispute got physical and now a husband and father is dead. This is Tacoma’s fifth homicide this year. Neighbors say they’re shocked by what happened as well they should be. Unfortunately domestic disputes can become deadly all too quickly. As always, the comments section is reserved for those friends and family who knew Richard and want to share anything about him or just share your condolences. –          Jack Cameron

Third and Fourth Tacoma Homicides of 2014 Denyse Marshall and AJ Geissler

tacoma_houseLast Thursday at a house on South 19th and L Street in Tacoma’s Hilltop neighborhood there was a loud argument that had turned violent. A 37-year-old man was convinced that a coworker and roommate was romantically involved with his live-in girlfriend. He beat the roommate with his fists and a chair and also assaulted his girlfriend. Police arrived and found a 25-year-old man named AJ Geissler bloodied and injured. They arrested the 37-year-old and took him to jail.

The man they arrested was no stranger to the law. In the last two years alone he’d been arrested four times for domestic violence though only charged in one of those cases. Before that, his ex-wife had gotten two restraining orders on him in 2008 and 2010. In 2012 another roommate got a restraining order against him after an assault.

The Tacoma Municipal Court had not finished reviewing the case and since he had not been charged, he was released from jail on Friday.

Hours after being released from jail, the man returned to the house on Friday and assaulted three individuals at the house. He killed AJ Geissler, the man he’d assaulted the night before. He also killed 59-year-old Denyse Marshall, his girlfriend’s aunt who was staying at the house while she went through a divorce. He also wounded a third person.

Denyse and Joseph are the third and fourth homicides Tacoma has had this year. This is as low as the homicide rate has been at this point in the year since I started writing about Tacoma’s homicides. Of course this does not lessen the impact by family and friends devastated by the loss of these two individuals.

Their killer has been arrested. Unfortunately no amount of justice is going to bring any real solace to the grieving friends and family of the victims. Sudden losses like this are catastrophic. Denyse Marshall and AJ Geissler were citizens of Tacoma deserving of a full life that was cut short. What we can do now is remember Denyse and Joseph and share any memories we have of them.

The comments section is reserved for friends and families of the victims.  I moderate and approve all comments before they appear. I am sorry for your loss.
– Jack Cameron

Morning In Tacoma

This photo is actually a combination of six photos I took from my phone yesterday morning using my phone. It was taken from the office building I work in.

This photo is actually a combination of six photos I took from my phone yesterday morning using my phone. It was taken from the office building I work in.